This Short Story About A Little Girl Who Lost Her Doll Will Make Your Heart Bleed

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    The following is a real story happened in the life of Franz Kafka(probably one of the greatest writers of all time)

    One year before his death, Franz Kafka saw a little girl in Berlin’s park, who was crying because she had lost her doll. She and Kafka searched for the doll unsuccessfully.

    Kafka told her to meet him there the next day and they would come back to look for her.

    The next day, when they had not yet found the doll, Kafka gave the girl a letter “written” by the doll saying

    “please don’t cry. I took a trip to see the world. I will write to you about my adventures.”

    Thus began a story which continued until the end of Kafka’s life.

    He brought a letter every day in which the doll tells of her adventures, which he himself had written the night before.

    ‘Your doll has gone off on a trip,’ he says.

    ‘How do you know that?’ the girl asks.

    ‘Because she’s written me a letter,’ Kafka says.

    The girl seems suspicious.

    ‘Do you have it on you?’ she asks.

    ‘No, I’m sorry,’ he says.

    ‘I left it at home by mistake, but I’ll bring it with me tomorrow.’

    The next day Kafka rushes back to the park with the letter. The little girl is waiting for him, and since she hasn’t learned how to read yet, he reads the letter out loud to her. The doll is very sorry, but she’s grown tired of living with the same people all the time. She needs to get out and see the world, to make new friends. It’s not that she doesn’t love the little girl, but she longs for a change of scenery, and therefore they must separate for a while. The doll then promises to write to the girl every day and keep her abreast of her activities.

    ‍‘Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures.’ – Doll

    ‍After a few days, the girl had forgotten about the real toy that she’d lost, and she was only thinking about the fiction that she’d been offered as a replacement. Franz Kafka wrote every sentence of this story in such detail, and with such humorous precision, that it made the doll’s situation completely understandable: the doll had grown up, gone to school, met other people. She always reassured the child of her love, but made reference to the complications of her life, her other obligations and interests that prevented her from returning to their shared life right now. She asked the little girl to think about this, and in doing so she prepared her for the inevitable, for doing without her.

    By that point of course, the girl no longer misses the doll. Kafka has given her something else instead, and by the time those three weeks are up, the letters have cured her of her unhappiness. She has the story, and when a person is lucky enough to live inside a story, to live inside an imaginary world, the pains of this world disappear. For as long as the story goes on, reality no longer exists.

    One day the girl got her doll back. It was a different doll of course, bought by Kafka as a last gift for her. An attached letter explained ‘My travels have changed me.’

    Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll.

    In summary it said:

    ‘Every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.’

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